the all alaska energy project
  • .
  • PHASE 1: NORTH SLOPE POWER GENERATION

    2,000MW Power Plant
    • Economies of Scale - Larger generation capacity producing more efficient power is more affordable
    • Cost Effective - Larger consumer base creates more affordable power
    • Lower Emmissions - More environmentally responsible and a step toward sustainability
    • New Energy Market - Taking stranded gas to market creates a long-term, sustainable market
    • Provide electricity for North Slope Activities
    • Replace mechanical gas-fired systems with electric
    • Provide avenue to integrate Arctic wind resources
    • Capital Cost - $2.5 Billion
      Delivered Power Cost - $0.05/kWh

      < What is HVDC?FAIRBANKS HVDC >
  • PHASE 2: FAIRBANKS HVDC TRANSMISSION


    400+ mile HVDC Transmission System
    • Power to GVEA - Adequate to provide space heat and power
    • Cost Effective - Larger consumer base creates more affordable power
    • Lower Emmissions - More environmentally responsible and a step toward sustainability
    • Adequate power for Fort Knox
    • Adequate power for the Livengood mining district
    • Capital Cost - $1.65 Billion
      Delivered Power Cost - $0.05 + $0.015 = $0.065/kWh

      < NORTH SLOPE GENERATIONWEST COAST HVDC >
  • PHASE 3: WEST COAST HVDC TRANSMISSION


    300+ mile HVDC Transmission System
    • Power to Kotzebue & Nome area - Adequate to provide space heat and power
    • Cost Effective - Larger consumer base creates more affordable power
    • Lower Emmissions - More environmentally responsible and a step toward sustainability
    • Adequate power for the Ambler mining district
    • Adequate power for Red Dog Mine
    • Path to market for West Coast wind power
    • Capital Cost - $900 Million
      Delivered Power Cost - $0.065 + $0.107 = $0.172/kWh (40% capacity)
                                                                            $0.12/kWh (85% capacity)

      < FAIRBANKS HVDCYUKON-KUSKOKWIM HVDC >
  • PHASE 4: YUKON-KUSKOKWIM HVDC TRANSMISSION


    300+ mile HVDC Transmission System
    • Power to Bethel and the surrounding area - Adequate to provide space heat and power
    • Cost Effective - Larger consumer base creates more affordable power
    • Lower Emmissions - More environmentally responsible and a step toward sustainability
    • Adequate power for Donlin Gold
    • Capital Cost - $510 Million
      Delivered Power Cost -
                        $0.065 + $0.058 = $0.123/kWh (40% capacity)
                                                      $0.098/kWh (85% capacity)

      < WEST COAST HVDCSOUTHCENTRAL HVDC >
  • PHASE 5: SOUTHCENTRAL HVDC TRANSMISSION


    300+ mile HVDC Transmission System
    • Power to Anchorage and the surrounding area - Supporting the local utilities
    • Cost Effective - Larger consumer base creates more affordable power
    • Lower Emmissions - More environmentally responsible and a step toward sustainability
    • Path to market for hydropower from the Susitna-Watana Dam
    • Pathway to integrate tidal or geothermal power
    • Capital Cost - $1.2 Billion
      Delivered Power Cost - $0.065 + $0.022 = $0.087/kWh

      < YUKON-KUSKOKWIM HVDC
  • HVDC:
    CONNECTING THE WORLD

    HVDC shapes the grid of the future around the world by bringing affordable power to and from remote resources at maximum efficiency.

    HVDC: THE TECHNOLOGY



    • Shaping the grid of the future

      Read about how HVDC is shaping the grid of the future by increasing capacity, enhancing reliability and improving the efficiency of energy systems around the world.

    • From 'joining the dots' to 'connecting the lines'

      The ability to transfer large quantities of electricity across vast distances with low losses and using minimal space make HVDC a sought after technology across the world. But it came from humble beginnings.

      Watch
      HVDC - An Introduction

      With few exceptions, the power lines you see carry alternating current (AC) connect power generation plants to consumers. Learn how HVDC is used to interconnect power resources over long distances where traditional AC connections cannot be used.

      read more
    • Why HVDC?

      Power stations generate alternating current (AC) and the power delivered to the consumers is in the form of AC. Why then is it sometimes more suitable to use direct current, HVDC, for transmitting electric power?

      read more
      Frequently Asked Questions

      Simple answers to some fundamental questions.

      read more
    • HVDC - A Technological Revolution

      Technologies based on direct current (DC) power can dramatically improve efficiency in many applications. ABB was a pioneer in DC power and continues to innovate its applications to help improve the way the world uses electricity.

      read more
      Tesla vs. Edison

      Perhaps the biggest technology debate that shaped the power industry played out in New York in the 19th century: AC vs. DC.

      read more
  • Follow the
    Conversation

    See what people across our state are saying about Alaska's energy challenge

    read more

    Alaska's Energy Challenge

    • A Somber Reality:
      Cook Inlet Natural Gas Shortage

      Recently released forecasts of Cook Inlet natural gas availability indicate that by ~2015 supplies will fall short of our demand.

      read more
      Alaskans spend over $3B/year on heat & power - and that cost is rising each year.

      With many Alaskans heating their home with diesel fuel, the cost of electricity isn't the only thing affected by rising fuel costs.

      read more
    • Fairbanks has some of the highest energy costs in the nation.

      After having the highest energy costs in the nation in 2011, Fairbanks continues to see rising energy prices well above the national average.

      read more
      The cost of energy has risen as much as +300% in some rural villages.

      With no other technology as reliable or well-tested, rural communities use diesel fuel for almost all energy needs. One in five rural households now spend over 50% over their annual income on energy.

      read more
    • With declining oil production, a primarily export economy and a reliance on the boom & bust cycle of exploration, Alaska desperately needs a comprehensive plan for a sustainable economy. Alaska Grid has one.

  • What is Alaska Grid?

    Affordable Energy for a Sustainable Alaska

    Alaska Grid is the vision of a High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) transmission line designed for delivery of affordable power at maximum efficiency throughout the State of Alaska.
    Large-scale power generation on the North Slope utilizing 'stranded' natural gas would enable the economies of scale by providing power throughout the State of Alaska - enabling a sustainable economy and creating thousands of jobs.
    The plan would lower emissions up to half by replacing aged, inefficient generation and providing access to otherwise inaccessible remote resources such as wind, hydro or tidal.

    < OUR STRANDED ASSETS  What is HVDC? >

    the plan

    • Does Alaska have an energy shortage?

      According to state reports, the North Slope has 235 trillion cubic feet (tcf) of technically recoverable gas.

      New gas extraction techniques, such as fracking, have driven the price of gas to record lows. As fracking becomes more widespread across the world, Alaska North Slope gas assets are virtually assured to remain 'stranded'.

      read more
    • North Slope Power Generation

      Utilizing the North Slope 'stranded' natural gas, new large-scale, high-efficiency generation would provide abundant, affordable power throughout the State of Alaska.
      Additionally, North Slope emissions would be reduced by over 50% while also enabling a long-term, sustainable market and creating thousands of new jobs.

      read more
    • High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) Transmission

      Not only is HVDC the most efficient, but it is also the most cost effective, proven technology available for delivering bulk power over long distances. Utilizing HVDC transmission, Alaska Grid would provide lower power costs and increase reliability by partnering with the local utilities in expanding the Alaska's power marketplace.

      read more
    • Fairbanks HVDC Transmission

      Phase 2 would transmit enough power to GVEA to affordably heat and power Fairbanks, Fort Knox and the Livengood mining district.

      With a estimated capital cost of $1.65B, Phase 2 would provide power at cost of $0.065/kWh - well below Fairbanks' current cost of power.

      read more
    • West Coast HVDC Transmission

      Providing power for the Kotzebue/Nome area, Ambler mining district and Red Dog Mine, Phase 3 would also provide a pathway to market for West Coast wind power.

      With a capital cost of $900M, Phase 3 would provide power at a cost as low as $0.12kWh to Western Alaska.

      read more
    • Yukon-Kuskokwim HVDC Transmission

      Not only would Alaska Grid provide affordable power for local residents and the fishing industry, but it would enable the development of Donlin Gold Mine while also utlizing low-carbon emissions power generation.

      Phase 4 would provide power at a cost as low as $0.098kWh to Bethel and the surrounding area.

      read more
    • Southcentral HVDC Transmission

      Providing adequate power to support the local Railbelt utilities, Alaska Grid would also provide a pathway to move the hydropower from the Susitna-Watana Dam or other remote resources.

      With a capital cost of $1.2B, Phase 5 would provide power at a cost as low as $0.087kWh to Southcentral Alaska.

      read more
  • the conversation

  • be Our Partner

    Interested in how your community or industry can benefit from affordable energy?

    A HVDC transmission grid would provide abundant, affordable power to urban and rural Alaska, as well as remote mining and industry. With affordable power, the Alaska economy would grow sustainably and attract long-term business that would create thousands of jobs.

    Such a grid would open the door to the development of otherwise inaccessible renewable resources such as wind, hydro and tidal and would support projects like the Susitna-Watana Dam as the state grows.

    Sign Up

    Contact
    your legislature

    Let your state representatives know you support a comprehensive energy plan that provides all of Alaska with abundant, affordable power, creates thousands of jobs and supports a sustainable Alaskan economy.

    Who are my representatives?

    Our Partners



  • Email us

    our Address

    Alaska Grid
    The All Alaska Energy Project

    2000 E 88th Ave
    Anchorage, AK 99507

  • Does Alaska have an energy shortage?


    The glut of shale gas in the Lower 48 threatens the economics of taking North Slope gas to market.

    According to state reports, the North Slope has over 235 trillion cubic feet (tcf) of technically recoverable natural gas. However, new gas extraction techniques such as hydraulic fracturing (fracking) and horizontal drilling have driven the price of natural gas to records lows.

    With higher capital costs than other gas developments and no existing infrastructure or large end user, Alaska gas is virtually guaranteed to remain stranded for the foreseeable future. For now, the availability of the clean-burning and relatively cheap natural gas from Lower 48 developments looks favorable as far as the eye can see.

    With the window for profitable Alaska pipeline gas sales to the mainland U.S. likely closed for decades and Alaska's reliance on reduced revenues from a slowly declining oil & gas sector, we can ill-afford to wait and see. The question remains - what are we to do with this plentiful and relatively inexpensive resource for the benefit of all Alaskans?

    < OUR ECONOMYThe solution >
  • energy & the alaskan economy

    Access to reliable and affordable energy underpins nearly every element of our economy.

    In a state full of vast natural resources, remote projects continue to be developed despite the inaccessbility of affordable power. The result is an economic reliance on the boom & bust cycle typical of resource exploration - a cycle Alaskans are painfully familiar with.

    But what if we were able to provide access to affordable and reliable power throughout the state - to the North Slope oil fields, the gold belts of the mountains, the coastal fishing towns or the ore mines of the Interior? And what if we had access to the remote wind potential of Western Alaska, tidal bays of Yakutat or geothermal pockets of the Aleutian chain? Could we shape the future of Alaska as we see fit - growing a sustainable economy by courting manufacturing, processing and technology industries and creating thousands of long-term jobs in the process? We believe so.

    We see Alaska as a state with more to offer than just our oil - a state full of people with big ideas and the will to make them succeed. And we believe that the path to success is through The All Alaska Energy Project - Alaska's access to affordable and reliable energy.

    < ENERGY IN RURAL ALASKAOUR STRANDED ASSETS >

    our vision

    • Affordable energy powers our standard of living.

      Affordable energy powers opportunity. It grows a vibrant economy, a robust job market and a lower cost of living.

      It heats our homes and powers our modern technologies, connects us to our friends and our families, and enables each of us to better our circumstances.

      Affordable energy is the catalyst required for a sustainable Alaskan economy.

    • Affordable energy powers job creation.

      Of the many economic benefits of affordable power, few are so direct as the creation of jobs.

      Not only would Alaska Grid invest in the state's economy as an employer and purchaser of goods and services, but the availability of affordable power throughout the state would transform the Alaskan marketplace by allowing private investors and manufacturers to build and operate facilities that could compete in the global marketplace - creating thousands of long-term jobs.

    • Alaska Grid provides access to a larger energy market.

      The All Alaska Energy Project would create an energy marketplace allowing local utilities, independent power produces and private investors to buy and sell power to new consumers previously out of reach.

      With access to a larger, growing consumer base, power utilities will be enabled to connect a greater number of renewable resources, including homeowners and small independent power producers.

    • Affordable energy powers mining and new development.

      With mining developers throughout the state looking for solutions to the high cost of operations, Alaska Grid provides the answer to the need for affordable power.

      Additionally, by using high-efficiency North Slope generation, we keep Alaska's air and water cleaner than the alternative of local diesel generation. The All Alaska Energy Project enables responsible and environmentally-friendly resource development.

    • Affordable energy powers new industry in Alaska.

      2011 marked the highest annual export value ever for the State of Alaska. Exported mineral ores alone increased 31.7% to $1.8 billion - $1.8 billion of potential industry and related jobs that should be in Alaska, not outside.

      Enabled by access to affordable power, the high cost of transportation can be eliminated - making the Alaska market more competitive.

    • Affordable energy powers the North Slope.

      With over 30 years in service, the aged power generation infrastructure on the North Slope is in need of replacement.

      New large-scale, high-efficiency generation on the North Slope would reduce current carbon emissions by over 50%. Additionally, The All Alaska Energy Project would invoke economies of scale in delivering power throughout the state and reduce further yet greenhouse emissions by displacing Alaska's large number of rural diesel powerhouses.

    • Alaska Grid enables wind power.

      Alaska has a tremendous amount of wind potential - a renewable resource that plays an ever-growing role in not only our local but also our global economy.

      However, the remote nature of our many potential wind sites has discouraged much development. The All Alaska Energy Project provides a path to market for remote renewable resources like Western Alaska's and the Aleutian chains's enormous wind opportunities.

    • Alaska Grid enables geothermal power.

      The All Alaska Energy Project provides a path to market for remote renewable resources such as geothermal assets in the Aleutian chain.

      Otherwise inaccessible but nonetheless large resources such as this can be developed with the confidence that a market exists for this source of clean, renewable energy. Local tribes and governments benefit from the development of these resources as well, providing local residents with affordable power from their backyard but current undeveloped.

    • Alaska Grid provides access to remote hydro resources.

      With the Sustina-Watana Dam and other even more remote hydro projects under development, The All Alaska Energy Project provides each with a path to market.

      Existing transmission infrastructure is not sufficient for transmission of these hydro projects' power and requires at minimum large upgrades. Alaska Grid's HVDC transmission system will be built with projects such as these in mind, ensuring the capability to absorb future growth.

    • Alaska Grid enables tidal energy.

      With some of the greatest tidal resources in the world, Alaska stands at the forefront of tidal generation technology.

      The All Alaska Energy Project enables the State of Alaska not only to take advantage of these clean renewable resources, but also to cement our role as a technology leader.

      In this role, we create a new market by exporting Alaskan knowledge and technology.

  • THE CHALLENGE OF RISING ENERGY COSTS

    Rising energy prices harm the rural way of life.

    "Abundant, low-cost energy underpins America's entire economy, freedom af movement, and way of life. In order to have any kind of economy, it takes affordable energy, and Alaska already pays the highest costs in rural areas in the country. Where high energy prices are prolonging an economic recession for the country, in Alaska, they are creating a crisis, threatening the village economy, culture, and way of life that has stretched back to time immemorial."
    - Congressman Don Young

    With few exceptions, rural communities in Alaska pay significantly higher fuel prices than urban areas. In 2011, the Interior village of Hughes reported the highest heating fuel costs of $9 per gallon. And AVEC-served communities have seen over a 300% increase in fuel costs in the last decade.

    Every aspect of rural life if impacted by the high costs of energy - from education to health care to daily necessities. With 1 in 5 rural households spending over 50% of their annual income on energy, the need for affordable power couldn't be more visible than in rural Alaska.

    < ENERGY IN FAIRBANKS  Economic Growth >
  • THE CHALLENGE OF RISING ENERGY COSTS

    Rising energy prices drive up the cost of living in much of Alaska
    more than any other factor.

    In 2011, Anchorage saw its second-highest inflation rate in a decade - from 1.8% to 3.2% - and rising energy prices explain most of the difference. With a 10.8% rise in 2011, Alaska has registered even bigger increases three other years in the past decade, demonstrating a trend Alaskans know all too well.

    Affordable energy is a vital component of a healthy economy and is essential to the viability and competitiveness of our businesses and industry, our future economy and job creation. With our average demand for energy 230% higher than the average energy demand of other states, it is even more critical that we solve our energy challenge now - before it is too late.

    < SOUTHCENTRAL GAS SHORTAGE Energy in Fairbanks >
  • THE CHALLENGE OF RISING ENERGY COSTS

    Fairbanks is struggling
    under rising energy costs.

    Nearly half of the power generation for Fairbanks and the vicinity utilizes petroleum products, making residents more susceptible to the rising costs of fuel. In fact, the key reason for electricity prices doubling lies in the rising fuel costs, which have tripled in the past eight years.

    With high energy prices strangling Fairbanks, residents are turning to wood - the most inexpensive fuel source - to heat their homes. And residents are paying the price: Fairbanks air quality is among the nation's worst. Concern is growing in the Interior, as this price is not just financial, but also the health of Alaska's second-largest city. Wood smoke - up to 70% of the air pollutants - is linked to asthma, heart attacks, strokes and premature death.

    < SOUTHCENTRAL INFLATION ENERGY IN RURAL ALASKA >

    read more


    • Survey: Fairbanks utility costs keep rising

      Fairbanks paid 143 percent more than the typical U.S. household for its utility costs in the third quarter of 2012.

      read more

    • Fairbanks Angry over High Energy Costs

      Nearly 1,900 turn out for annual meeting to complain they are paying too much.

      read more

    • "I'm not leaving Juneau without a solution."

      Legislators tasked with developing Alaska's resources to solve the state's energy problems.

      read more
  • ALASKA'S ENERGY CHALLENGE

    • A Somber Reality: Cook Inlet Natural Gas Shortage

      With most of our current Railbelt power generation coming from natural gas, hundreds of thousands of consumers are critically dependent on the Cook Inlet natural gas supply. A recently released review of forecast supply and demand commissioned by Enstar, Chugach Electric and Municipal Light & Power indicates that by about 2015 the flow of natural gas from Cook Inlet wells will begin to fall short of the combined demands of gas and utility customers.

      The study by Petrotechnical Resources Alaska attempted to understand not just how much natural gas remained in the Cook Inlet region, but also the specifics of current and anticipated production and demand. The study results presented a somber reality.

      The 2012 report found that it would require 13-14 new wells to be completed per year just to avoid the inevitable shortfall predicted in 2013. The 2012 update notes that between 2010 and 2012 sixteen wells have been added and that - while the new production has helped avoid the anticipated 2013 shortfall - it is simply not outpacing natural field decline.

    • continued, A Somber Reality: Cook Inlet Natural Gas Shortage

      In fact, Cook Inlet producers would need to increase production 2-3x the current trend to avoid short supply as early as 2014 or 2015, despite the fact that utility gas demand has decreased in the past few years due to the recent addition of more efficient electric generation.

      Absent any large discovery that can be brought to production in 1-2 years, and with North Slope pipeline projects years away, the study concluded it may be necessary for Southcentral utilities to import either liquid or compressed natural gas to fill the impending gap.

      What does this mean for consumers? Rising energy prices.

      Cost of Living Increases with Rising Energy Prices >
Affordable energy
for a

sustainable alaska

Alaska Grid envisions a High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) transmissions system - including large-scale natural gas generation on the North Slope - designed for delivery of affordable energy at maximum efficiency through the State of Alaska.
READ MORE
Cook Inlet
Natural Gas

Hundreds of thousands Railbelt Alaskans are critically dependent on natural gas - both for heating and electricity. Recently released forecasts of Cook Inlet natural gas availability indicate that by ~2015 supplies will fall short of our demand.
READ MORE
Energy Costs
Are Rising

Delivered fuel costs to many rural communities in Alaska have risen more 300% in the last decade. With 1 in 5 rural households spending over 50% of their income on energy expenses, Alaska needs affordable energy now more than ever.
READ MORE
What is
HVDC?

With few exceptions, the power lines you see overhead carry alternating current (AC) power. High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) transmission lines lose less energy when transmitting bulk amounts of power long distances where traditional AC connections are not ideal - and are more affordable.
READ MORE
Alaska Grid
in the news

As Alaskans look for a solution to the rising costs of energy, Alaska Grid has an answer. Read more about our plan to boost the economy and create jobs by providing affordable energy throughout the State of Alaska.
READ MORE
Be our
Partner

Interested in how your community or industry can benefit from affordable energy? Want to join the Alaska Grid team in advocating for a comprehensive energy plan for sustainable Alaskan future?
Sign Up Now
Alaska Federation of Natives passes
resolution

Alaska Federation of Natives, Inc. urges the State of Alaska to engage in examining the feasibility of the All Alaska Energy Project and to commit state resources to developing this project to free all Alaskans from the crippling burden of expensive energy.
Read More